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Moving Image

Shinhoo Yhi


Shinhoo Yhi is an artist, currently based in London, whose work focuses on converting real-time performance into video. The work positions the camera at various distances from the performance to scrutinize how the camera preserves and kills the liveness of the body. In the continuum of body filming a body, body encountering another body, she questions the setting of reality that can neither be made with an intention nor a mystery.


Education

2021 M.A Contemporary Art Practice: Moving Image, School of Arts and Humanities, Royal College of Art, London, UK

2016 B.A. Fine Arts, School of Visual Art, Korea National University of Arts, Seoul, Korea

Degree Details

School of Arts & Humanities

Moving Image

There are 3 works presented on this page, alongside a publication that consists of a conversation between an editor and a viewer about the ‘editing’ aspect of each work. 2 performances of baby, dog, and Dog have been re-edited from the original footage as an online version. The exhibition version of baby, dog, and Dog will be presented at Cromwell Place during 22 - 25 July 2021.

In baby, dog, and Dog, the body of the videographers, and the handheld camera are also invited into the performance. The videographer traces the performance through the lens, the editor juggles between sensual and descriptive images, and this act of looking is passed on to the eye of the audience. The performers are given directions that are impossible to reach with a human body such as the state of an animal, the consistent speed of a machine, or death. They are ignorant towards the presence of each other, and collaboration is excluded. 

yellow-furr-fox was filmed during the first lockdown in London in March 2020. In the deserted street where people had disappeared, a person holding a camera looks for a fox in the dark. The foxes were wandering around, eating food wastes from the bin to sustain their life. It seemed like they had occupied the city with an agreement that the takeover would only last temporarily. As the camera gets closer, the fox disappears into the noise of the screen.


*Image: Still image of baby, dog, and Dog 2

baby, dog, and Dog 1 (Online Version) — 4'29", single-channel video, 2021

*It is advised to watch the video on full screen, quality setting as 4K (2160p).

*The online version of baby, dog, and Dog 1 was re-edited from the original footage by Yi-ho Yan, and the 12-minute exhibition version of baby, dog, and Dog 1 was edited by Shinhoo Yhi.


Excerpt from Publication

Viewer: Were there a reference point with respect to which images are scrolled upwards, downwards, or sideways?

Editor: The first scene where the dog appears was inspired by Eadweard Muybridge’s ‘The Horse in Motion’. I used the scrolling effect across multiple still images to show how a man would crawl like a dog. As for the series of images that were scrolled up and down were decided based on the movement in which the order of the images was created and how it combined with the pitch of the sound. 

Viewer: I didn’t notice that while l was watching the video. But, it was interesting to explore the relation between image and sound. It felt as if both image and sound were moving with the same rhythm. It seemed like there was a certain rule in combining the two. 


To read the full version, click the link below.

baby, dog, and Dog 2 (Online Version) — 9'38", single-channel video, 2021

*It is advised to watch the video on full screen, quality setting as 4K (2160p).

*The online version of baby, dog, and Dog 2 was re-edited from the original footage by Yi-ho Yan, and the 21-minute exhibition version of baby, dog, and Dog 2 was edited by Shinhoo Yhi.


Excerpt from Publication

Viewer: In the online version of baby, dog, and Dog 2, a videographer with a GoPro in hand appears frequently. He bluntly scans the other performer. I can’t tell whether you had any tactics, but the videographer's actions are on a very fine line between a performance and a re-enactment of inappropriately scanning another person’s body. It reminds the audiences of a man scanning a powerless woman and the potential issues that action could indicate. But, before anyone can really think more deeply into that matter, the scenes change. If the scene of the cameras filming the performer lying down were slightly longer, the issue could have been more explicit. But the scene changes and it relieves the audiences from overthinking the actions behind it. So I’m curious whether the timing of the scene transitioning was intended. 


To read the full version, click the link below.

yellow-furr-fox — 15'18", single-channel video, 2020

*It is advised to watch the video on full screen, quality setting as HD (1080p).

*After 31 August 2021, Request password to shinhooyhi@gmail.com to watch the video.


Excerpt from Publication

Viewer: The editing in yellow-furr-fox has a distinctive pace. Where in baby, dog, and Dog 1 (Online Version) was “like when someone was counting down from three to one, but never finished calling out “one””, yellow-furr-fox takes a longer-deep breath. Just like how people’s heart rate slows down in their sleep. I thought about a mythology or a dream - night scenes, a person chasing a fox, yellow graphics that seem like a trace of the fox, and terrifying situations. The pace of the editing works well with such surreal reality.

Editor: Could you tell me more about the relationship between this deep breath, dream, and mythology?

Viewer: Perhaps the word ‘mythology’ or ‘dream’ sounds like the theme of the work, but it’s actually not. The speed of the camera chasing the fox or the action of zooming in and out raises tension, yet, the slow pace in editing recalls a mysterious moment of a dream. Similarly to how you can feel your own presence in a dream even if it’s blurry and ungraspable. This atmosphere was created by editing.


To read the full version, click the link below.