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Lue Fang

Lue is a multidisciplinary designer from a multidisciplinary background. Interested in tackling complex problems and generating design concept, Lue started his bachelor degree of psychology and dived into Innovation Design Engineering at the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London. Besides, his personal interests have been pursuing his exploration of concept art in entertainment industry.

Degree Details

School of Design

This project is inspired by some fictions of William Gibson, the sci-fi writer who coined the word “cyberspace” 40 years ago in his book <Neuromancer> where the “matrix” is described as a place where multinational information systems mutate and breed into startling new structures whose beauty and complexity are unimaginable.

when we look back today, we would find part of William’s prediction has become true. If it was a man from hundreds of years ago, he might need to walk all the way from one place to another in the city to complete his one day’s work, social, and other entertainment activities. They could estimate whether they could take more workload in the rest of the day through muscle soreness and physical fatigue. But for people from the post-modern era, there is no “mileage” concept in cyberspace, it can not be measured. We find the concept of “mileage” is gradually disappearing.

In this project, I aim to design a negotiation between internet users and cyberspace. My design objective is to provide a solution for mental exhaustion and digital fatigue for those medium-to-heavy internet users. This forward-thinking innovation would be an attempt to find out a new reference system to describe people’s daily routine progress when time and geospatial is no longer applicable,so as to save people from digital fatigue.


Digital life points to the future but has its problems: A social survey initiated by the International Labour Organization found that digital life is more exhausting than imagined. The main reason is that, when people use digital channels to work or entertaining, it’s too easy for them to switch one task to another while too difficult for them to judge whether they should take a break. It seems that when we entered the postmodern era, we suddenly discovered that we did not know what is the best way to describe the progress of the day. Before the information age, people can estimate whether they can take more workload in the rest of the day through muscle soreness and physical fatigue. But nowadays, the Internet has erased commuting expenses, as well as the public’s keen perception of fatigue, which eventually leads to our overestimation of our mental energy. And this is particularly harmful to heavy internet users today, in the previous interview, many people reported remote work has pushed them into a “never-ending sales mode”.

That's why this project will focus on the "post-epidemic era” context where digital services & entertainment are popular and the labor market is going through a quick digital transformation. My design objective is to provide a solution for mental exhaustion and digital fatigue for those medium-to-heavy internet users. This forward-thinking innovation would be an attempt to find out a new reference system to describe people’s daily routine progress when time and geospatial is no longer applicable, so as to save people from digital fatigue.

Cyberspace Pedometer is an installation that helps people manage their mental energy more wisely when cruising in cyberspace. It forms a symbiotic system with a personal computer and intervenes in the interaction between users and network, helping individuals better perceive willpower consumption and personalize the information, so as to reduce “willpower” expenditure.

— Social psychologist Roy Baumeister conducted a series of studies(1996) and believed that the individual’s willpower can be regarded as a constant and limited resource. Every time individuals conduct an activity, they will be cognitively or emotionally depleted. This partially explains why people can only deal with limited daily activities in a day. Obviously, this law also applies to the context of cyberspace.
— the algorithm here is very similar to "using machine learning to predict movie ratings". I choose [amount of information], [activity characteristics] , [activity duration] and [attitude] as feature vectors.Besides, I invited participants to subjectively assess their mental fatigue caused by multiple online activities via a rating of fatigue and finally got over 900 trials to get a basic dataset.