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Photography (MA)

Anna-Lena Krause

Anna-Lena Krause is a photographer and visual artist from Berlin, currently based in London. Her work explores sociological and cultural phenomena in modern societies, focusing primarily on perception and memory. By combining photography, film and sculpture she explores contrasting modes of representation, highlighting the differences in our shaping of concepts, suggesting that perception is not passive but active, driven by intentionality. Her work questions how our understanding of ourselves is influenced by the environments we are nurtured in.

She obtained her BA of Photography at University of Applied Science in 2018 in Berlin and her MA Degree in 2021 at the Royal College of Art in London. 

Krause has had various group exhibitions including the Rencontres des Arles, France, the European Months of Photography in Berlin, ‘Sweet Harmony‘ at Saatchi Gallery in London, ‘No Photos on the Dance Floor‘ at the C/O Berlin and ‘Up All Night: Looking Closely at Rave Culture’ at KUMU Art Museum in Estonia. 

Degree Details

School of Arts & Humanities

Photography (MA)

We don’t see a naked world, we see a world which has been created through language, concepts and above all, memory. It is a phenomenological truth that perception is active action driven by intentionality and thereby our understanding of the world becomes diversified.

Working with friends and members of my community, my work combines photography, film and sculpture, to explore contrasting modes of representations to highlight the differences in our shaping of realities. There is an inequality between being in a situation, seeing a situation and telling the situation. Different nuances which exist side by side, none of them less true than the other. 

Phenomenology, intersubjectivity, inter-corporeality, mirroring, and the in-between, all core themes of my practice. They are theories and concepts attempting to interpret the complexity of human connection and the unseen space that develops between them. How do we frame the subjects involved and where do the boundaries lie between them? Can an interaction itself be viewed as an additional entity? Or can we become one through an interaction?

Image credit: Myro Wulff

We perceive ourselves only in relation to those around us; consciousness is experienced by contrast. However, ‘mixing’ is an idea we rarely talk about; when we are with others, especially loved ones, we mix and it becomes harder to tell if we are still apart.

'The Third Entity' meditates on togetherness and apartness in social spaces, looking at the fixity of borders and skin. We need borders to separate - between inside and outside, me and you, up and down, here and there, right and wrong. There are many concepts attempting to interpret the complexity of human connection and the unseen space that develops between them. How do we frame the subjects involved and where do the boundaries lie between them? Can an interaction itself be viewed as an additional entity? Or can we become one through an interaction?

Medium:

Reinforced Cement, PLA Wood Filament

Size:

140x38x38cm and 150x38x38cm

The Human Knot is a documentation of the first person point of view in a shared experience. A team building exercise in which the performers move around each other trying not to fall apart, metaphorical of the ways we become entangled with one another. We all experience the world through the first-person-point-of-view, yet our mobility allows us to access the world of other.

During the performance each participant was asked to stop filming when they feel one minute has past, capturing not just their point-of-view but also their perception of time.

Medium:

Moving Image, 00:10:36h

Size:

2-4 42inch television screens
Two Cities With the Same Name — 70cm x 85cm, wood, edition of 4 + 2 AP
A Tale of Three Cities / Like a Ship by the Sea That Knows it has an Anchor — 70cm x 85cm, wood, edition of 4 + 2 AP 20cm x 26cm, metal, edition of 6 + 2 AP

Medium:

Wood, Metal

‘I Hold You Together’ is a visualisation of two bodies melting into one: one holding and the other being held. The mingled bodies create a blur by undoing the clear lines between them, suggesting that it t’s rarely either or but usually both - nobody is untouched by the world they live in. The work explores fragmentation, asking what is the thing that holds us in place - that keeps us together?


Medium:

Clear resin, blue ink

Size:

75cm x 50cm x 60cm

Rose Finn-Kelcey Scholarship